Mole Management

Getting a mole can be embarrassing, uncomfortable and sometimes dangerous. Although the treatment of moles usually isn’t necessary, it is important to seek a board-certified dermatologist in order to determine if it showed be biopsied for cancer. In the case of a suspicious-looking mole, the doctor will take tissue from the mole to test to see if there are any precancerous or cancerous cells.

If results do come back as cancerous, the entire mole and in some cases the small area of tissue surrounding the mole will have to be removed surgically with a scalpel or a sharp punch device. The area is then stitched up and a healing plan to minimize scarring should be set into place. If the mole grows back it’s very important to go back to the doctor immediately.

Moles, which are typically brown or black, can appear anywhere on the skin by itself or in a cluster. When cells in the skin grow together and on top of each other instead of being spread apart throughout the skin, it forms a mole. Congenital nevi is a mole that appears at birth and occurs in one out of 100 people. Moles may darken from sun exposure, especially during the teens years and during pregnancy.

Dysplastic nevi moles are larger than the average mole, which should be about the size of a pencil eraser, and are an irregular shape. People with dysplastic nevi, could have over 100 moles on their body, which means they have a greater chance of developing melanoma, the most dangerous form of cancer. Moles that develop after the age of 30, or ones that change color, height, size or shape are of serious medical concern and should be evaluated immediately. Especially moles that bleed, ooze, itch or become tender or painful should be examined.

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