Young Women are the Highest At-Risk Group for Basal Cell Carcinoma: Skin Cancer

Whether you’re getting a tan on the beach, in a tanning bed or even accidental overexposure to the sun, it’s not good. Achieving a tan through cumulative ultraviolet ray (UV) damage can lead to premature skin aging which includes wrinkles, loose skin, and brown spots, as well as skin cancer. The number of incidences of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has been increasing An estimated 30 million people tan indoors every year in the United States, and among them, a majority of them are women as well as individuals younger than 40 years old. There is a 50 percent increased risk of BCC with indoor tanning.

Basal cell carcinoma is the most common type of cancer in the United States. BCC is a skin cancer caused by UV light exposure and begins in the deepest layer of the epidermis. BCC typically occurs in areas that are exposed to the sun, such as the head, face and neck but can develop in any area of the body. BCC is a slow-growing cancer that rarely metastasizes, however is can be very damaging. If left untreated, BCC will continue to grow and will invade and destroy the surrounding skin and tissues beneath the skin. Indoor tanning increases your risk of developing early-onset basal cell carcinoma by 69 percent and contributes to the estimated 170,000 cases on skin cancer reported annually.

As a fellowship-trained dermatologist and skin cancer surgeon, Dr. Rokhsar is an expert in treating Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, melanoma and other precancerous cells. Mohs surgery is a specialized surgical technique that involves removing skin cancer layer-by-layer to examine the skin beneath. Scarring is minimized using Dr. Rokhsar’s wide range of laser treatments to choose from, along with his extensive knowledge and experience in using the lasers.

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